Drink

Can you get drunk off music at a ‘listening bar’?

Oobah Butler keeps off the booze to give his verdict on Spiritland

Can you get drunk off music at a ‘listening bar’?

Novelty has become the lifeblood of London. That cafe you loved on Stoke Newington Church Street? It's now a vaping warehouse for droids. Most new spots open with a sideways glance, crazed gurn and elbow nudge, rather than straight-faced sincerity. But a new hero is bucking the trend: Spiritland, the "listening bar" in Kings Cross that's "a paradise for anyone from the aficionado to the curious".

It definitely takes itself seriously, from its one-of-a-kind speaker system to DJ sets from big names like Hot Chip and Jarvis Cocker. And that's great! But one issue: what the hot hell is a listening bar? Dudes in At The Drive-In T-shirts who occasionally look up from their William Burroughs novel to give an appreciative nod? An immersive experience that leaves no room for anything but absorbing tunes? One so intoxicating that it can get you drunk on music? I tried to stay sober on a Thursday night to find out.

Spiritland is tucked away in a ghost town of half-finished apartment buildings, mournful Bella Italias and broad, empty streets. It's a diverse crowd, but everyone has one thing in common: we're sat in a spartan room with dinner and drinks, facing The Bloody Big Music Blaster. This is Spiritland trying to tap into a supposed new trend: pals going out just to listen to music, not dance. So nod along, but don't expect space to flail around like an M-Cat fiend.

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Tonight, Jolyon Green's smooth clarinets ooze out. Neither imbalanced nor throttling, the setup sounds wonderful. It's official: I am woozy; totally drunk on music. But getting there requires an indulgent, eyes-closed isolationism that goes against its appeal to groups going out. You can have a table-banging debate about zero-hours contracts with the squad, or you can surrender to sound and fully appreciate the tech. Doing both is harder.

There's also the Dad's-cologne whiff of pragmatism over the layout. If you were to place all your focus on the listening experience, you wouldn't have so many tables right at the front. The speakers would creep away from the wall. You wouldn't serve food. So Spiritland finds itself in a no man's land, ostensibly appealing to both the casuals and the committed, but not being quite right for either.

But this is probably as music-obsessed as we can get in London 2017 – it could have been more dedicated elsewhere in Europe, but the closure of clubs and gig venues shows we turned our backs on music. So I order a beer, relax and enjoy Spiritland for what it is: an imperfect yet inventive space for a bit of small-group musical nerding.

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